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Conservation

/Conservation

Conservation

Conservation of the Daintree Rainforest region was formally considered as an integral part of the ‘Daintree Planning Package; a study undertaken to identify actions needed to preserve the area’s environmental assets, provide for a sustainable and prosperous eco-tourism industry primarily based on the presentation of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, and to address adequately the needs and rights of local residents and land owners.  It was presented to Douglas Shire Council on 5 May 1994.

The area north of the Daintree River is widely recognised as an area of outstanding significance and a key component in the tourism industry of Far North Queensland.  It is an area of special importance to local residents and landowners for the particular lifestyle and business opportunities it offers.

The central catchment in Cooper Valley is the richest and most diverse source of primitive, rare and threatened species.  The burden of Conservation and Protection of this prestigious area falls directly onto the shoulders of the landholders.  The Daintree Rainforest is the last surviving relict of Gondwana.  It has been nurtured and protected, its’ temperatures moderated by proximity to the sea and closeness to the equator, free from volcanic eruptions, shielded from lava outflows emanating from upheavals to the north and south and having its own special microclimate.  Nature has smiled benignly on this small area of Australia and preserved it. This is the closest counterpart to Gondwana remaining as a record of a lusher era.  We can learn from its ecological balance and, in recognising its’ unique strategies for perseverance and survival, we can become an integral part of the ecosystems; we can adapt and change for our own survival.

We at Cooper Creek Wilderness however, liked the altruistic promise of being on the cutting edge of genuine conservation, and also in being part of a community that is recognised as the united and dedicated custodian of the Daintree Rainforest.  Neil and I were embarking on new careers.  From teaching in classrooms to teaching in the oldest rainforest in the world, and we were supported with the best teaching aide possible, Cooper Creek Wilderness, Daintree Rainforest.

This was not a case of “familiarity breeding contempt.”  It was the reverse.  The more we learned about our rainforest, the more we were humbled by its amazing and inspirational qualities.  Everything about rainforests that we have read about, heard about and taught in classrooms, is insignificant when considered against the depth of real experiences gained from living in the Daintree Rainforest.

We offer a different vision based on factual documentation, images taken over many years, research and ideas nourished by the richness of our environment and passion shared across three generations living in harmony with the environment.  4We also offer an alternate conservation model that is paid for by landowners and ethical travellers.  It is an achievable model that does not require subsidisation by the public purse, but it does require recognition and support to flourish.  We have achieved cost-effective conservation without government support or subsidisation and in spite of existing impediments. The partnership between ethical travel and conservation has proved to be the most cost-effective means of protecting and conserving this global treasure.

When you join a rainforest tour with us, your payments contribute to the management of the land.  They also support the transmission of values between people and across generations.  Without your participation the intellectual property of a custodial community would be lost.

The Daintree Planning Package was a study undertaken to identify actions needed to preserve the area’s environmental assets, provide for a sustainable and prosperous eco-tourism industry primarily based on the presentation of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, and to address adequately the needs and rights of local residents and land owners.  It was presented to Douglas Shire Council on 5 May 1994.  The area north of the Daintree River is widely recognised as an area of outstanding significance and a key component in the tourism industry of Far North Queensland.  It is an area of special importance to local residents and landowners for the particular lifestyle and business opportunities it offers.  The central catchment in Cooper Valley is the richest and most diverse source of primitive, rare and threatened species.  The burden of conservation and protection of this prestigious area falls directly onto the shoulders of the landholders.

Daintree Rainforest is the last surviving relict of Gondwana.  It has been nurtured and protected, its’ temperatures moderated by proximity to the sea and closeness to the equator, free from volcanic eruptions, shielded from lava outflows emanating from upheavals to the north and south and having its own special microclimate.  Nature has smiled benignly on this small area of Australia and preserved it. This is the closest counterpart to Gondwana remaining as a record of a lusher era.  We can learn from its ecological balance and, in recognizing its’ unique strategies for perseverance and survival, we can become an integral part of the ecosystems; we can adapt and change for our own survival.

We at Cooper Creek Wilderness however, liked the altruistic promise of being on the cutting edge of genuine conservation, and also in being part of a community that is recognised as the united and dedicated custodian of the Daintree Rainforest.  Neil and I were embarking on new careers.  From teaching in classrooms to teaching in the oldest rainforest in the world, and we were supported with the best teaching aide possible, Cooper Creek Wilderness, Daintree Rainforest.

This was not a case of “familiarity breeding contempt.”  It was the reverse.  The more we learned about our rainforest, the more we were humbled by its amazing and inspirational qualities.  Everything about rainforests that we have read about, heard about and taught in classrooms, is insignificant when considered against the depth of real experiences gained from living in the Daintree Rainforest.

We offer a different vision based on factual documentation, images taken over many years, research and ideas nourished by the richness of our environment and passion shared across three generations living in harmony with the environment.

We also offer an alternate conservation model that is paid for by landowners and ethical travellers.  It is an achievable model that does not require subsidisation by the public purse, but it does require recognition and support to flourish.  We have achieved cost-effective conservation without government support or subsidisation and in spite of existing impediments. The partnership between ethical travel and conservation has proved to be the most cost-effective means of protecting and conserving this global treasure.

When you join a rainforest tour with us, your payments contribute to the management of the land.  They also support the transmission of values between people and across generations.  Without your participation the intellectual property of a custodial community would be lost.

Make no mistake. People are part of the environment.  They have a complex mantle of responsibility, which holds them accountable to their partners in protection, the paying customers.  A Partnership in Protection becomes essential to conservation and protection.  By accepting responsibility, as a traveller or as a rainforest custodian, is mutually beneficial and reliant.  Benefits do not just accrue to the environment.  You, the altruistic traveller will gain enormously from the experience.  Here’s a comment that describes the experience:
“As long-time lovers of rain forest and the tranquility it always brings, we were not expecting to be so overwhelmed by the sheer majesty and antiquity of the rain forest that you so carefully preserve and so obviously revere. The visual impact was enhanced by the generous sharing of knowledge you have acquired during your stewardship of this wondrous place making it the best four hours of our lives. it was like being transported back through time. The bonus of it all was your descriptions of the relationship between that most ancient of peoples, the original Aboriginal inhabitants of this place, and the myriad plants, insects and animals that inhabit it – if that knowledge is ever lost it will be tragedy on a scale that is hard to measure. If I never experience the joy and wonderment of a rain forest again I will leave this life feeling utterly satisfied. We can only wish that others will take this unique opportunity to experience something that can be found nowhere else. Thank you again for the experience and for being the carer of that wonderful and wondrous piece of this planet. (Ken and Rae South Australia).

Make no mistake. People are part of the environment.  They have a complex mantle of responsibility, which holds them accountable to their partners in protection, the paying customers.  A Partnership in Protection becomes essential to conservation and protection.  By accepting responsibility, as a traveller or as a rainforest custodian, is mutually beneficial and reliant.

Benefits do not just accrue to the environment.  You, the altruistic traveller will gain enormously from the experience.  Here’s a comment that describes the experience:

As long-time lovers of rain forest and the tranquility it always brings, we were not expecting to be so overwhelmed by the sheer majesty and antiquity of the rain forest that you so carefully preserve and so obviously revere. The visual impact was enhanced by the generous sharing of knowledge you have acquired during your stewardship of this wondrous place making it the best four hours of our lives. it was like being transported back through time. The bonus of it all was your descriptions of the relationship between that most ancient of peoples, the original Aboriginal inhabitants of this place, and the myriad plants, insects and animals that inhabit it – if that knowledge is ever lost it will be tragedy on a scale that is hard to measure. If I never experience the joy and wonderment of a rain forest again I will leave this life feeling utterly satisfied. We can only wish that others will take this unique opportunity to experience something that can be found nowhere else. Thank you again for the experience and for being the carer of that wonderful and wondrous piece of this planet. (Ken and Rae South Australia).

By | 2017-04-21T07:39:49+00:00 April 8th, 2017|Miscellaneous|0 Comments

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